303804 (1)

Swinging into Fun

multi-sensory-environment-banner

What a shame the UK weather let us down again… But lets all keep our fingers crossed that we enjoy an Indian Summer this September so we can see the playgrounds and recreational centres across the country covered with little bodies climbing, sliding and swinging.

Read more >

303804 (1)

Let’s Get Scooting

Any environment that works with children with sensory processing concerns will most likely have a few staple pieces of equipment that seem to be tried and true to the trade.  One of those items is a scooter board.  Whether it is square or rectangle, homemade or bought, scooter boards have been found to be effective for so many reasons when treating children with vestibular, proprioceptive, core stability, and coordination issues.  It is definitely a favourite for children, therapists, and teachers alike.

Read more >

303804 (1)

Handwriting: It is More Than Meets the Eye.

Written by Deanna Macioce, MS, OTR?L

Handwriting: a common topic of conversation among teachers, therapists, and parents. When attempting to assess a child’s handwriting and legibility skills, the child is typically asked to complete a writing sample, either by copying, self-generation or dictation, and the adult will look at the finished product, as well as the grasp. However, when the task of handwriting is broken apart, we find there are a lot of other skills that contribute to the success writing.

Read more >

303804 (1)

Looking ‘Deep’ for Ways to Calm

Book-a-visit

Looking ‘Deep’ for Ways to Calm

As adults, in our daily lives we are always naturally choosing techniques that calm and regulate us.  We have learned that chewing gum during a staff meeting helps us to stay alert or to fall asleep at night we need to have a blanket on us no matter how warm it may be.  These are those little things we do to feed our sensory systems.  Every day we all use coping mechanisms despite not having a diagnosis that includes sensory processing concerns.  From the time we were infants we began the process of trying to figure out what made us tick, but oftentimes it required the assistance of our parents.  For example, it was our parents who figured out that wrapping us in a swaddling blanket or providing us with a pacifier would quiet our cries.  Inherently we then began the process learning what our systems required.

Read more >

303804 (1)

Ayres Sensory Integration 2020 Vision

Ayres Sensory Integration 2020 Vision

The year 2020 marks what would have been the 100 year birthday of Dr. A. Jean Ayres.  In commemoration of this milestone, professionals from all over the world have proposed the following vision:

Read more >